Volume 18, Issue 1 -- 2019

Leadership tenacity for school superintendents rests largely upon experience, grit, and subsequently resilience as they balance the pressures of the operational challenges of school operation with the instructional needs of the children they serve. Through this study, the authors identified the critical aspects of how effective superintendents may have developed and whether deliberate practice was evidenced in their experience. The superintendent’s perseverance to doing what matters over an extended period of time and under challenging conditions contributes to leadership grit and resilience. Viewed through the lens of these superintendents, experience, grit, and resilience influence leadership tenacity interdependent, but not limited to the theory of deliberate practice and transformational leadership.

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The purpose of this study was to begin exploring the nature of leadership behavior and style, as it relates to team functionality. The extent to which the problems we face grow and become more complex; solutions require multiple perspectives, requiring researchers to be prepared to lead large groups of collaborators from a variety of disciplines. This study sought to explore the self-perceptions of principal investigators related to their leadership style and team functionality. Using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire developed by Bass and Avolio (1995) and Lencioni's Team Assessment (2002), it was found that transformational leadership was self-perceived to be used the most in contrast to transactional leadership behaviors. With respect to team functionality, absence of trust and inattention to results showed the greatest concern to principal investigators, yet fear of conflict did not.

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As leadership continues to be a targeted outcome of student learning within higher education, university faculty are left with the challenge of how to best teach and develop leadership in college students. Students are a key component of undergraduate leadership education; their motivations, learning goals, and understanding of their experiences in leadership programs. However, the research on undergraduate leadership programs from the students’ perspectives is relatively scarce and limited in scope. To address this gap in the literature, we surveyed 130 current students and alumni of one leadership minor program and interviewed coordinators of seven other leadership minor programs. Our mixed methodology allowed us to capture unique insights regarding the perceived benefits and challenges of a leadership undergraduate minor.

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Increasingly, universities are involved in providing leadership development opportunities that support students’ academic endeavours and their personal and professional development, including employability and citizenship skills. Leadership experiences are beneficial not only for students, but also for universities, the wider community, and future employers. To develop a greater understanding of students’ perceived benefits of their involvement in peer leadership activities, a group of Australasian universities participated in a pilot survey based on the United States National Survey of Peer Leadership. Overall, the results suggest students believe they benefit from peer leadership experiences across a range of key outcomes areas, most prominently creative problem solving, appreciation of diversity, and a sense of belonging and contributing to the university community.

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This article showcases how mobile app technology can enhance leadership education through a new mobile app called My Student Leader. My Student Leader represents a novel approach to leadership education so that students may use smartphone technology to enhance student leadership development on campus. The app facilitates the creation of Leader Plans associated with service learning activities and campus events which then can be emailed to team members, faculty and staff. There also is a section for students to write a Leadership Legacy reflection. This application brief addresses the stages of development of the app and the outcomes associated with mobile technology use for leadership education.

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Leadership development has been viewed as a foundational component of agriculture education and the FFA since the early 20th century (Hoover, Scholl, Dunnigan, & Mamontova, 2007). To contribute to previous research in the field of leadership, this study lays the framework for future studies on the leadership styles of those individuals who lead today’s youth in FFA programs across the State of Texas. This study describes FFA advisors of successful FFA programs in terms of their leadership styles, leadership training/educational background, and suggests how FFA advisors could use their leadership styles to improve their programs. Participants reported engaging in behaviors related to transformational leadership, M = 3.15, more often than those related to transactional, M = 2.45, or laissez-faire leadership styles, M = 0.86

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Interdisciplinary leadership education programs attempt to integrate students from diverse backgrounds and ideologies within contexts that facilitate cognitive growth and allow students to engage with real world problems. Specifically, the development of agency and effective decision-making can provide students with a powerful toolkit replete with the necessary capacities and dispositions for addressing complex global problems. However, recently counterreality has created significant challenges for leadership educators. Counter-reality, or the pervasive and persuasive replacement of objective truths with subjective opinions grounded in falsehoods, lead perceptions and provide barriers to developing leadership students primed for sustainably addressing complex organizational and community challenges. The following educational framework intends to address the challenge posed by counter-reality by developing agency in leadership students, so they are better equipped to ask incisive questions when presented with counter realities. Addressing counter-reality through the development of agency is incredibly timely as false claims and misinformation are presented on nearly a daily basis.

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This study followed 134 university students within a national sample for one or two years, from their initial participation in a LeaderShape Institute session. We examined the shape of their trajectories of leadership growth over this course of time, with particular focus on development long after the session had ended. We also investigated the degree to which additional formal leadership development opportunities statistically predicted leadership development. Results indicated a typical non-linear shape to development and suggested that most formal experiences, as a whole, possess little association with leadership growth when controlling for other experiences associated with leadership development in students.

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This innovative practice paper discusses how a journalism training practicum empowers and emboldens participants to think critically about their professional goals and allows them to emerge not only with new technical skills but also as industry thought leaders. The news industry is facing a profound technological upheaval as the majority of news consumers turn to their smartphones for content. News organizations need workers with skills and competencies suited to this new environment, but they also need those infused with an entrepreneurial spirit willing to take on significant structural challenges within an industry that honors tradition. In this practicum, thought leadership is emphasized as a desired byproduct of a training model that relies heavily on coaching.

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Online higher education has rapidly expanded in the United States and displays a great opportunity for growth. Coupled with the growth of e-learning is the need for adjunct faculty to satisfy the need for additional online classes. Despite the importance of online adjunct faculty, little research has been performed to determine their work experiences. This quantitative, correlational study investigated the predictive relationship between the perceived use of transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership behaviors on the extra effort of adjunct faculty who facilitate online classes at a for-profit university in the United States. In a further investigation, the researcher investigated the variable of job satisfaction to determine if it mediated the relationship between leadership style and extra effort. The researcher used the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and Spector’s Job Satisfaction survey to collect data used in inferential analysis. The researcher performed a stepwise multiple regression and a Baron and Kenny mediation analysis to answer the research questions. The results showed perceived transformational leadership behaviors displayed a statistically significant positive predictive relationship with extra effort, and job satisfaction was a partial mediator between the relationship of transformational leadership and extra effort. The results suggest transformational leadership is beneficial to the extra effort put forth by the sample of adjunct faculty who teach online classes.

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Given societal calls for transformational leadership that will lift people to higher levels of motivation and critical consciousness, this paper critiques existing student leadership education efforts and proposes that leadership educators adopt core tenets of feminism in order to prepare students to be engaged, change-oriented leaders in their communities. Today’s literature on student leadership development places an over-emphasis on positional leadership, technical problems, and leadership competencies. Feminism can serve as a theoretical strategy for addressing these problems by considering the complexities of identity, re-conceptualizing power, amplifying student voice, and encouraging activism. In particular, we argue that consciousnessraising is essential for leadership development and offer ways in which it can be employed within leadership curriculum, among student leaders, and among leadership educators.

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This study examined university students’ perceptions of generational issues in the workplace. Baby Boomers are retiring rapidly (their knowledge and experience retiring along with them), and Millennials are now the largest generational group represented in the workforce. Students at a mid-sized university in the southeast region of the United States, majoring in Leadership or attending a leadership skills development workshop, were surveyed to determine their views on challenges and opportunities that exist due to the current generational landscape of the workforce. Results of the study indicated that reconciling various perspectives was both the top challenge and benefit when working with members of other generations, and that opportunities for reciprocal mentorship were valued by members of each generation surveyed. Recommendations for leadership educators and future researchers are provided.

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As an adult-learning practitioner, I am intrigued by the process of helping learners, especially leaders, develop through the affective domain. Although leaders in my experience often comprehend the lexicon of emotional intelligence (EI), incorporating EI for leadership development has proven elusive. While research suggests EI is difficult to develop in people, this paper argues that leaders can do so by tapping into a higher mental and emotional state, and that such mindfulness practices can enhance leaders’ EI. Findings suggest that (a) EI positively impacts leadership effectiveness, (b) mindfulness can serve as a method for growing EI, and (c) mindfulness can enhance the practice of leadership. The paper offers recommendations for adultlearning practitioners who create EI- and mindfulness-based training and provides directions for future research.

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The purpose of this article was to examine the effects of strengths-based approaches in co-curricular and curricular leadership on first-year students’ holistic thriving, academic thriving, social thriving, and psychological thriving. We used propensity score matching and regression analyses with survey data from the Thriving Quotient, which was administered to first-year students at a large, public research university (n = 548). The results suggest students’ enrollment in a strengths-based leadership minor course was associated with higher levels of thriving in social, academic, and psychological domains. Students’ participation in strengths-based student organizations was associated with higher thriving in social domains, while concurrent enrollment in the strengths-based leadership class and participation in strengths-based student organizations was associated with significantly higher holistic thriving, social thriving, and psychological thriving.

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With team-based structures replacing traditional hierarchical systems, the purpose of this paper was to explore the concept of shared leadership and its impact on improving team performance. The five underlying mechanisms that form the components which drive shared leadership, namely (1) trust, (2) empowerment, (3) age and maturity, (4) fair reward, and (5) dispositions and beliefs, provide readers with a practical understanding of how to attain, maintain, and regain shared leadership for the performance of teams in organisations today. In addition, a focus on shared leadership in other team contexts, such as sport, unconventional and multicultural environments is also discussed to aid the progression of shared leadership research and broaden its application beyond traditional business and managerial contexts.

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